The process of pet adoption

The central problem in adoption is whether a new owner can provide a safe, secure, long lasting house for the pet. Responsible shelter pounds, and save companies do not provide animals to people whom they assess not able to provide the animal with an appropriate house.

Sometimes, a new owner may face training or actions difficulties with a pet, who has been ignored, misused, or left inexperienced. In many cases, tolerance, training, and reliability of good care will help the pet get over its past.

A permanent house is the house of an adopter who confirms the responsibility of the pet for its whole life. There are two basic understanding of the idea. An extensive presentation simply says that the adopter of the pet confirms that the pet’s well-being is now their personal liability for the rest of their life.

If the adopter can no longer keep the pet for any purpose, they would need to find a happy and healthy house for the pet, and make sure that peoples of the new house are looking after the pet for entire life. Should the adopter die before the creature, they should have a plan in place for the good care of the pet and hence need a pet insurance.

A more limited view that some shelters attempt to incorporate as an ingredient of the adopting contract places conditions on when and why the adopter could organize to go the pet to a new family.

For example, permanent house contracts might specify that the adopter will not get rid of the pet for simple factors, or that the adopter will always be sure that the pet will be allowed should they shift to a new property.

Some contracts might specify allergic reactions or violent actions on the part of the pet as factors allowed for an adopter to give up the animal.

One issue shelters are fighting to get rid of is what they term Big Black Dog syndrome. Big black dogs (BBDs) are continually most difficult pets to place — even if they are friendly in nature, well qualified, and in perfect health.

This may be due to a number of aspects, such as fear stigma against certain breed types, fascination to ads and the proven reality that black dogs often do not photograph as well as less heavy covered ones, and the proven reality that black pets are often represented as competitive in the movie and on TV.

Companies have begun strategies to inform the people about BBD problem.

5 Most Common Myths About Pet Grooming

There are many myths when it comes to pet grooming, so knowing the right way to brush and bathe your dog or cat can be a little confusing. To help you separate fact from fiction — and help you avoid making potentially dangerous grooming mistakes — I'm dispelling some of the most common misconceptions about pet shedding, shampooing, bathing and more.

EmbeddableSlideshow: This Veterinarian’s Five Most Annoying Pet Grooming Myths – EMBEDDABLE SLIDESHOW

Common Grooming MisconceptionsMyth 1: Some dog breeds don't shed.: Myth 2: “Hypoallergenic” breeds are the ideal solution for allergic owners.: Myth 3: Pets need baths only infrequently.: Myth 4: People shampoo is just as good as pet shampoo.: Myth 5: Tear stains are bad and should be treated.: More on Vetstreet:

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Kitten Focus Group Watches Vice Presidential Debate

Who won the vice presidential debate Tuesday night? While cable news networks featured human focus groups watching Democrat Tim Kaine debate Republican Mike Pence to give them a sense of which candidate performed better, The Late Show with Steven Colbert had a much cuter idea: an all-kitten focus group. The panel of kittens was streamed live on Twitter and Facebook, with a screen featuring the debate in their pen. “Less than 30 seconds into the VP debate, one member of our focus group already tried to escape,” the Late Show said on Facebook. Later, more than half of the panel was “visibly napping,” while the undecided kittens hung out in the litter box. All of the kittens were available for adoption through the North Shore Animal League. — Read it at the Hollywood Reporter

Original Article

Pet Scoop: Dogs Recovering From Injuries Become Pals, Kitten Rescued From Ledge

Oct. 5, 2016: We've scoured the Web to find the best and most compelling animal stories, videos and photos. And it's all right here.

Image: Thor and Petunia


Injured Pups Help Each Other

Two dogs who were rescued after being hit by cars on the same day in two separate incidents in Arizona have become best buddies. Thor, a 4-month-old black Shepherd, was more severely injured, with two broken legs. The Animal Benefits Club of Arizona stepped up to get him help — and Petunia, a smaller white pup, was brought in with less severe injuries on the same day. They quickly became pals. “They act like the other dog is their whole reason for being,” said Andra Jeffress, the group’s executive director. “When one sees the other, their little faces light up and their tails start wagging … Thor likes nothing better than to cuddle Petunia with his head and neck around her as if he is trying to let her know how much he loves her.” Petunia shows her love by giving her buddy kisses. The Animal Benefits Club is raising money to cover the cost of Thor’s care. — Watch it at People Pets

Virginia Police Dog Recovering After Shooting

Authorities in Virginia have caught a suspect who allegedly shot a police dog who was pursing him. Police said they stopped a vehicle for a traffic infraction on Sunday night. The driver was wanted on several felony warrants and was taken into custody without incident, but the passenger, Joseph Conway, fled the scene on foot. As an officer and K9 Dux chased him, police said Conway turned and fired a pistol, and struck Dux at least once. Dux was taken to a veterinary hospital for treatment and is “resting comfortably” after surgery. He got to go home with his handler, Spotsylvania County Sheriff’s Deputy Kory Kelly, on Tuesday. Conway faces arrest warrants on several charges. — Read it at the Washington Post

Crowd Cheers for Released Sea Turtles

A group of Australian schoolchildren and their parents cheered as two sea turtles who’d each spent six months in rehabilitation at a turtle hospital headed back out to sea last week. Summer, a 15-to-20-year-old hybrid green and Hawksbill turtle, had been found with injuries from two fishing hooks lodged in her mouth. Sophie, a green turtle who’s between 10 and 15 years old, was found malnourished and lethargic when she was rescued. They recovered at the Great Barrier Reef Aquarium turtle hospital until they slowly made their way back out to their ocean home on Thursday. — Read it at Today

Image: Late Show Kitten Focus Group


Kitten Focus Group Watches Debate

Who won the vice presidential debate Tuesday night? While cable news networks featured human focus groups watching Democrat Tim Kaine debate Republican Mike Pence to give them a sense of which candidate performed better, The Late Show with Steven Colbert had a much cuter idea: an all-kitten focus group. The panel of kittens was streamed live on Twitter and Facebook, with a screen featuring the debate in their pen. “Less than 30 seconds into the VP debate, one member of our focus group already tried to escape,” the Late Show said on Facebook. Later, more than half of the panel was “visibly napping,” while the undecided kittens hung out in the litter box. All of the kittens were available for adoption through the North Shore Animal League. — Watch it at the Hollywood Reporter

Kitten Saved From 12th Story Ledge

A kitten in Singapore escaped from a window and got stuck on a ledge on the 12th floor of the building. While police officers waited on the ground with an open blanket, a rescue officer from the Society for Prevention of Cruelty Animals Singapore used a long pole with an adjustable rope to capture the frightened kitten. The kitten grabbed ahold of the pole as it was gently pulled up to safety. The SPCA advised the building’s owner to ensure screens are in all of the windows so this situation could be avoided. — Read it at UPI

Original Article

Why Does My Cat… Play With Toilet Paper?

Image: Cat playing with toilet paper ThinkstockPhotos-545988242.jpg


My cat constantly plays with the toilet paper — she unrolls it and bats it around and makes a huge mess. Why does she do this, and is there some way to put a stop to this behavior?

Having your house TP'd from the inside by your own cat may seem like a cruel prank. Toilet paper streamers aren’t anyone’s ideal home decor, and the constant cleanup may well feel frustrating.
Your cat may play with the toilet paper for several reasons: She may be acting on her instinct to hunt, imitating your actions in the bathroom or just trying to keep herself occupied during the day. Regardless of her motivation, the solution is to redirect her away from the TP and get her focused on something more constructive — and less messy.
To end the mess, focus on redirecting your cat's energy to more acceptable alternative behaviors.

Put a Stop to the TP Party

You will have the best chance of putting a stop to the constant TP party if you focus on prevention plus redirection. Closing the bathroom door when you’re not around makes this space off-limits to your cat. A toilet paper holder that covers the roll may be another useful alternative, especially if it’s difficult to keep the bathroom door closed all the time.
Provide other outlets for your cat and reward her when she chooses them. Cats have an instinctive desire to hunt, and because of this, they appreciate interactive toys that respond to their movements and can be ripped and pulled apart similar to killing and devouring prey. Food puzzles are one good option. There are a range of food puzzles for cats designed to provide a more natural hunting-type experience. Movable puzzles where contents are unearthed with paw action may be especially beneficial in this situation.
Start with easy-to-access food puzzles; as your cat learns how to make them work, increase the difficulty. Puzzles may be filled with kibble or treats.
Additionally, you can encourage explorative behavior by hiding food puzzles, kibble, treats, cat grass and prized toys throughout your home in areas your cat is particularly fond of, like perches or climbing structures. Rotate toys and hidden items to help keep the activity interesting for your cat.

Keep Kitty Busy

Your cat will also benefit from regularly scheduled daily training, play or interactive time. Choose activities that are fun for both of you, like learning a trick or playing with a feather toy. Set aside five to 15 minutes one to three times a day to spend interacting with your cat.
When you’re not around, interactive, independent toys, such as those with remote-control options, motion-sensor toys, timed toys or hanging toys for batting, can also help entertain your feline. Keeping her occupied may make it less likely that she will attack the toilet paper.
If your cat has a special preference for paper-like items, consider offering designated alternatives she can claw up and bed down in, such as stuffing a cardboard box with shredded or crumpled-up paper or newspaper (but only if your cat doesn't eat paper). Additionally, ensure that scratching posts are placed in easily accessible areas.
When kitty plays with the right toys or engages in appropriate activities, reward her with things she finds reinforcing like treats, play, petting or praise. If kitty's caught in the act of clawing up paper, nonchalantly redirect her away and clean up the scene of the crime while she’s out of view. Punishment only heightens problems and relationship tension and may inadvertently reinforce the behavior.
Finally, if your cat is eating the paper, seek help from a specialist like a veterinary behaviorist.
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